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Berthel Michael Iversen: architect May 13, 2020 – Posted in: In The News

Quick facts Intro Architect Was Architect Type Engineering Gender Male Birth 1 January 1906 Death 1 January 1976 (aged 70 years) The details Biography Berthel Michael Iversen (1906–76) aka B.M. Iversen, was a Danish architect active in Malaysia, and the founder of Iversen, van Sitteren & Partners. Most of his works were in Malaya (now Malaysia) and Singapore. He designed a large number of buildings in his Malayan home town, Ipoh. He eventually had offices in…

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Iversen: Architect of Ipoh and Modern Malaya May 7, 2020 – Posted in: Reviews

Review by Mark Hinchman Berthel Michael Iversen (1906–76) was born in Denmark, but his entire professional career played out in Malaya, where he worked from 1928 to 1966. For more than three decades, he was one of the major figures working to create a distinctive Southeast Asian architectural modernism. Examining his career offers a means of probing the specifics by which modernism flourished in the region. In this book on her father’s life and work,…

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In 1911, another epidemic swept through China. That time, the world came together April 27, 2020 – Posted in: In The News

Paul French In 1911, a deadly epidemic spread through China and threatened to become a pandemic. Its origins appeared to be related to the trade in wild animals, but at the time no one was sure. Lockdowns, quarantine measures, the wearing of masks, travel restrictions, the mass cremation of victims, and border controls were deployed to try to lower the infection rate. Yet more than 60,000 people died in modern-day northeast China, making it one…

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The untold origin story of the N95 mask – Posted in: In The News

The most important design object of our time was more than a century in the making. Mark Wilson It’s hard to think of a symbol of COVID-19 more fraught than the N95 respirator. The mask fits tightly around the face and is capable of filtering 95% of airborne particles, such as viruses, from the air, which other protective equipment (such as surgical masks) can’t do. It’s a life-saving device that is now in dangerously short supply.…

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How Malaysian plague fighter Wu Lien-teh laid down lessons for Wuhan virus – Posted in: In The News

Toh Han Shih A century ago, Wu stopped a pneumonic plague that killed 60,000 in northeast China using preventive measures considered ahead of their time Wu’s lessons still hold relevance in modern medicine today, a Singapore professor says As the number of coronavirus cases continues to rise in China and elsewhere, the efforts of a Malaysian doctor who ended a pneumonic plague that killed 60,000 in northeast China a century ago bears lessons for the current pandemic,…

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Wu Lien-Teh: Malaysia’s little-known plague virus fighter – Posted in: In The News

Wong Chun Wai HIS name does not exist in our school history books and he has never been accorded the recognition that he truly deserves – and what’s more, he was a Malaysian. In the fall of 1910, a pneumonic plague which originated in Russian Siberia, broke out in Harbin, the north eastern region of China. The epidemic spread so quickly that within four months, it claimed 60,000 lives. This is perhaps a good time…

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A Malaysian Designed The Original N95 Mask. He Also Stopped A Plague That Killed 60,000 – Posted in: In The News

Sadho Ram The Penangite, who is renowned in China for his work, was the first Malaysian to be nominated for a Nobel Prize in Medicine in 1935. His name, however, has never found a place in our school history books. The coronavirus pandemic has shone a light on the extraordinary work of a Malaysian doctor who stopped a pneumonic plague so bad it was dubbed “apocalyptic” because it killed 100% of those infected in 1910.However,…

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Mak Yong, a Unesco ‘Masterpiece’ and one of Malaysia’s oldest forms of dance-dramas April 16, 2020 – Posted in: In The News

Dinesh Kumar Maganathan If you have ever wanted to discover the story behind Mak Yong, one of the country’s oldest forms of dance-dramas from northern Malaysia, this movement control order (MCO) period might be the best time. Traditional arts and culture organisation Pusaka, together with Walkabout Asia, has recently presented an online video series about Kumpulan Mak Yong Cahaya Matahari and community based in Kuala Besut, Terengganu. “Any time is a good time for Malaysians…

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Reviving the kampung house January 13, 2020 – Posted in: In The News

Association hopes to boost appreciation of Malay architecture 28 Dec 2019 Nuradzimmah Daim WHEN one mentions Malay architecture, images of wooden village houses with carvings and everything traditional would normally come to mind. But for architect Mior Zawari Hassan, there is more to that.  He added that Malay architecture symbolised the community’s innovation and harnessing of nature’s resources, while giving soul to their work that embodied their cultural identity. “While many people say it’s difficult or expensive to build a traditional house…

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Up Close and Personal December 5, 2019 – Posted in: In The News

By Regina Hoo Meet Rosnan Rahman, Malaysia’s only active male Pak Yong dancer. A USM architecture graduate, Rosnan was introduced to the world of Mak Yong by Professor Emeritus Datuk Dr Mohamed Ghouse Nasuruddin, and took to it like a duck to water. “I fell in love with it — the authenticity and the uniqueness of music, costume, dance and history of Mak Yong is very different from other art forms within the performing arts…

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