Talk at SOAS, University of London: Chulia Cultural Expressions in nineteenth century Penang

TALK AT SOAS (The School of Oriental and African Studies)

The author Khoo Salma Nasution gave a talk at SOAS in London on ‘Chulia Cultural Expressions in nineteenth century Penang’ on 23 April 2015.

 soas-logo11 Venue: Room B102, Brunei Gallery
SOAS, University of London
Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square
London, WC1H 0XG.
(View on Google Maps)

Bangsawan-smaller

In the early nineteenth-century Penang, leading Tamil Muslims – formerly called Chulia – profited from trade and property and created religious endowments which benefited the community. The Chulia were religious functionaries, scribes, and teachers. They transformed religious celebrations and pioneered performing art forms such as Boria and Bangsawan. They also spearheaded Malay and Tamil newspapers, which achieved regional circulations. The study of this historical community, accompanied by a cultural mapping of their sacred sites, urban spaces and local-global connections, reveals the flourishing of an urban Muslim identity, one which was transformed by proto-nationalist ethnic construction which undermined the cultural ethos of cosmopolitan Islam.

 

AS FEATURED IN RECENT TALK AT SOAS (The School of Oriental and African Studies)

The author Khoo Salma Nasution gave a talk at SOAS in London on ‘Chulia Cultural Expressions in nineteenth century Penang’ on 23 April 2015.

 soas-logo11 Venue: Room B102, Brunei Gallery
SOAS, University of London
Thornhaugh Street, Russell Square
London, WC1H 0XG.
(View on Google Maps)

Bangsawan-smaller

In the early nineteenth-century Penang, leading Tamil Muslims – formerly called Chulia – profited from trade and property and created religious endowments which benefited the community. The Chulia were religious functionaries, scribes, and teachers. They transformed religious celebrations and pioneered performing art forms such as Boria and Bangsawan. They also spearheaded Malay and Tamil newspapers, which achieved regional circulations. The study of this historical community, accompanied by a cultural mapping of their sacred sites, urban spaces and local-global connections, reveals the flourishing of an urban Muslim identity, one which was transformed by proto-nationalist ethnic construction which undermined the cultural ethos of cosmopolitan Islam.